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Denim Hair: Interpreting This Trend In Salon

It’s not quite Granny Hair, it’s not quite Rainbow Hair, but, confusingly, it’s kind of both. That’s right, our never-ending penchant for denim has seeped into this month’s hair trends, so if you’re the kind of person who thinks double denim is too much, it may be time to look away. If not – we invite you to proceed.

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Facilitated through Instagram as always (#denimhair, but you could have guessed that) and solidified as a trend by Generation Z queen Kylie Jenner, Denim Hair is so mammoth that it’s been dubbed Rainbow Hair’s successor – and certainly it’s edgier cousin.

While we’re now aware that Kylie Jenner is given free reign of style and colour with wigs and extensions rather than using her own hair (her hairdresser Jonathan Colombini spills her hairdressing secrets here), her choice to go denim, even just temporarily, makes this trend a bona fide hit.

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Will this new bold trend be a feature in salon? According to Valonz Head Colourist Ash-Leigh Croker, the answer is a resounding yes. “100 per cent,” she answered, when asked if denim was salon-appropriate. “I would do a blue or grey or something like that at least every two or three days. Over the last three to four years we’ve had an influx of rainbow tones and the play of pigment, while the blue has been popular probably over the last 6 months.”

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Kylie Jenner’s influence is paramount at Valonz, with Ash-Leigh listing her main bold colour and denim demographic as “18 to 25 year olds; your younger, alternate clients.” However, the variance in the trend allows almost anyone to enjoy it, with an older demographic opting for a more diluted interpretation of the trend, and younger clients able to wear stronger tones.

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That’s because, as with all good denim, Denim Hair has the benefit of offering a myriad of tones, from Kylie’s deep navy blue, to lighter blues, purples or even more Granny Hair-esque greys. Being able to discern which tone will suit your clients – think in terms of their skin tone, hair style, makeup, personal style and level of commitment – is pivotal.

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“The first thing I ask the client is ‘how committed are they to this look?’ Because if you do a deep turquoise or an emerald sort of tone, you’ll have more time with the colour, whereas with pastels, if you get that silvery powdery blue, soft green or lilac, the durability isn’t as long,” Ash-Leigh shared.

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“For choosing the tone, I look at the person; how they dress, if they wear makeup, how they style their hair, because that determines how far you can push it,” Ash-Leigh continued. She cautions the trend may be a mistake for clients with a red pigment in their skin, or those who don’t wear a lot of makeup, and advises it for her more adventurous, experimental clients. A bob or lob cut is also her style of choice to complement the colours, with the warning that longer hair, combined with these rainbow tones, can make clients skew younger.

You may roll your eyes at these never-ending Internet hair trends, but there’s no doubt they’re a win for your salon’s cash register, and for your inner artist. Professional hair maintenance is more significant – and achievable – than ever and the online community is constantly expanding your clients’ definition of what’s trendy.

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“Having things like Instagram and Pinterest is making our culture of hair in Australia more exciting,” Ash-Leigh agreed. “We went through a whole stage of balyage and low maintenance hair, and it’s definitely changed now where people are going platinum blonde, they’re going bolder, and the colours are more maintainable. It’s better for our industry and it’s also more fun. We’re not just doing classic foils anymore.”

With your clients’ tresses now matching their jeans – you can say that again.

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